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No-Knead Rosemary Parmesan Peasant Loaves

One of my favorite dinners is a fresh salad & a side of crusty bread. I love Macaroni Grill’s Rosemary Bread. It has a crusty shell and a rosemary-infused soft middle. The secret to getting a crusty shell is creating a steamy baking environment. You can do this at home by preheating a pizza stone for the dough and a broiler pan for hot water, used to create the steam. And don’t be tempted to open the oven until the cooking time is nearly finished. This no-knead recipe makes four 1-pound loaves which can be made on demand from refrigerated dough (for a week or more). Before serving give it a brush of olive oil and a sprinkle of kosher salt. I recommend serving with Italian Butter with Balsamic Parmesan (see below).

Rosemary Parmesan Peasant Loaves  

(c=cup, T=tablespoon, t=teaspoon)
Adapted from Master Recipe found in Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day
Makes four one-pound loaves
Making the Dough: Prep Time – 15 minutes or less | Initial Rise Time – 2 hours
On baking day:  Prep time – 10 minutes | Rise time – 40 minutes | Bake time – 30 minutes

Ingredients

3-1/4 c lukewarm water
1-1/2 T granulated yeast (any kind – 2 packets)
1-1/2 T Kosher salt
1 c whole wheat flour
5-1/2 c unbleached all-purpose flour (bleached will work)
2-3 T fresh rosemary diced (maybe more depending on preference)
2/3 c parmesan cheese, shredded
Egg wash (1 egg + water)
Italian Butter : 1/4 c olive oil, 1-2 T balsamic vinegar , black pepper, and 3-4 T parmesan cheese, shredded

Mixing and Storing the Dough:
1) Mix the yeast and salt with the water in a 5-quart bowl, or a lidded (not airtight) food container.

2) Mix the remaining dry ingredients, plus rosemary and parmesan without kneading, using a spoon. You may need to use wet hands to incorporate the last bits of dough.

3) Cover (not airtight) and allow to rest at room temperature until the dough rises and collapses (or flattens on top) approximately 2 hours.

4) The dough can be used immediately after the initial rise, though it is easier to handle when cold. Refrigerate in a lidded (not airtight) container and use over the next 12 days.

On Baking Day: 

Prepare pizza peel. If you have a pizza peel, lightly dust with corn meal. If you don’t I’ve found the easiest method for getting the unbaked loaves into the pre-heated oven is using a piece of parchment paper on a cookie sheet (with no sides) so that it can slide off easily. Once prepped, you can begin working with the dough.

The gluten cloak: don’t knead,  just “cloak” and shape the loaf in 30 to 60 seconds. Dust the surface of the dough with flour and cut off 1-pound (grapefruit-size) piece. Dust the piece with more flour and quickly shape it into a ball by stretching the surface of the dough around the bottom on all four sides, rotating the ball a quarter-turn as you go. (See video for this process.) The correctly shaped process should take no more than 30-60 seconds.

Rest the loaf.  Place the shaped ball on the peel or parchment and allow to rest for about 40 minutes, uncovered. Twenty minutes BEFORE baking, preheat oven to 450 degrees, with a baking stone placed in the middle rack. Place an empty metal pan or broiler tray for holding the water on any shelf that won’t interfere with the rising bread.

Dust, slash & egg wash. Lightly dust top of the loaf, which will allow the slashing knife to pass without sticking. Slash a 1/4-inch-deep cross or scallop pattern into the top, using a serrated knife. Next, beat an egg with a splash of water. Using a pastry brush, lightly brush egg wash over dough (avoiding slashes).

Bake. Prepare 1 cup of hot water for steam bath. Once oven is preheated & 40-minute rise time is complete, slide the loaf directly onto the stone. Pour hot water into metal pan and close oven. Set timer for 26 minutes and check for a golden coloring. Remove from oven and cool completely on a cooling rack.

Serve with Italian Butter:  1/4 c olive oil, 1-2 T balsamic vinegar , black pepper, and 3-4 T parmesan cheese, shredded

© Dorene Krausnick and KrausnicKitchen 2011-2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material (text and images) without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Dorene Krausnick and KrausnicKitchen with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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Comments
4 Responses to “No-Knead Rosemary Parmesan Peasant Loaves”
  1. Sherri Lee says:

    drooling…

  2. Kelsey says:

    I will try this! Baking bread is my favorite thing ever!

  3. I’m interested to hear your results you two. I used 1-1/2 tablespoon rosemary, and next time I’ll do 3 tablespoons. I’ve read that the dried equivalent for rosemary is 1 tablespoon fresh to 1 teaspoon dry. So maybe 3t dry or 3T fresh. If you try either, was it enough?

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  1. […] is QUICK. Serve with a crusty loaf of bread along side to soak up the goodness, or try these Rosemary Peasant Loaves. To preserve leftovers, dress salads individually and reserve extra arugula, steak, and dressing […]



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    © Dorene Krausnick and KrausnicKitchen 2011-2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Dorene Krausnick and KrausnicKitchen with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
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